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Eva’s Story: ”Toi j’te baiserais… J’vais t’avoir que tu veuilles ou non”

I was on my way home from work around 5:30 pm, beginning of July, warm and sunny. I was about 6 meters away from my front door, keys already in my hands when a total stranger grabs my arm and tells me “Toi j’te baiserais.’ (I would fuck you). I manage to get free and walked quickly to my door, he kept on screaming things along the line of “J’vais t’avoir que tu veuilles ou non” (I’ll get you whether you like it or not).

I got in my apartment, locked the door and that’s when I notice that he was trying to look in for my front window, I closed the curtain but I could still see that he was still standing right in front. I was alone at home and terrified that that man would try to break in, I hid in my bathroom.

I finally got in touch with some friends who live in the same area and they came over to make sure he wasn’t still there.

I've got your back!
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Annick’s story: ”As I started to lock up my bike, my neighbor whistled at me AGAIN, this time from the upstairs balcony”

I experience street harassment on most days, whether I am on bike or on foot. Most of the time, I don’t get to reply since the perpetrators are already gone by the time I react. All of these experiences accumulate.

My upstairs neighbour and some of his friends often “Hey girl” me. This morning, as I crouched to unlock my bike, my neighbour wolf-whistled me as he pedaled off on his bike. It’s fucking 35°C outside and I have to bike to work and I can’t wear shorts and a crop top without getting unnecessary feedback as to my appearance! Needless to say, I started my day super pissed off, in adrenaline-angry mode.

I got home around 10 pm. As I started to lock up my bike, my neighbor whistled at me AGAIN, this time from the upstairs balcony. “NO!” I yelled, stony-faced with anger. He actually walked down the staircase and started making excuses and I held up my hand, exclaiming “You don’t talk to me like that. I’m not your dog”, also maintaining the bitch-stone-face as I kept walking towards my appartment. He tried to follow me to explain that he whistles because he doesn’t know my name (wtf) and I again did the palm-up “shut up I don’t give a shit” move.

I’m glad that, for once, I got to answer.

I've got your back!
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Catherine’s Sotry: On Bike Harassment

I was coming home from a lovely evening with a friend last night, riding my bike west-ward on Ontario towards the deMaisonneuve bike-path and I was waiting at the red light right in front of Katacombes. So i’m sitting on my bike, and this entitled DICK-BRAIN LOSER casually walks by me and gropes my ass, completely unceremoniously without saying anything, so I shove him off, and start swearing at him profusely… So this complete and utter piece of shit of a human being backs off a bit, then grins at me, then comes back forward and FLICKS MY BOOB and stumbles backwards again, still smiling, while i’m literally imploding with wrath. I really wanted to get off my bike and do something, punch him, kick him, spit at him, scare him and get that fucking smile off his face but decided that I didn’t want to leave my bike unattended / put myself at risk / bother with such a pathetic dipshit no-life stinky butt slug… ARGGGHHH TIMES INFINITY!!!!!

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L’histoire de Camille: ”Il se met alors à m’insulter et à me dire que je n’ai aucun respect, que je lui dois mon respect”

Je revenais chez moi après l’école, il était 16h30 un jeudi, donc il y avait beaucoup de monde dans le métro. Comme d’habitude j’emprunte les escaliers pour sortir sur la rue Berri. Cependant, au bas des marches, un homme m’intercepte et se met complètement en travers de mon chemin en me disant en anglais que je suis belle et qu’il voudrait mon numéro de téléphone. Je lui fais un signe de la main afin qu’il me laisse tranquille, je le contourne et continue mon chemin. Il se met alors à m’insulter et à me dire que je n’ai aucun respect, que je lui dois mon respect. Comme je ne l’écoute toujours pas et que je continue mon chemin, il continue à m’engueuler et finalement il me donne un violent coup de pied aux fesses qui me fait bondir. Je me retourne vers lui en lui criant « c’est quoi ton problème? Laisse moi tranquille » (avec quelques insultes de plus), mais il continue de me sermonner en me disant que je dois être gentille avec les gens, que je n’ai pas de bon sens, que je dois changer mon comportement et sourire lorsqu’on m’aborde. Je dois avouer avoir été trop figée de colère et de peur puisqu’il était très grand et qu’il se rapprochait de moi avec son poing fermé brandit en l’air comme pour me frapper. J’ai couru dans les marches en lui criant de me laisser tranquille et que je ne lui devais rien. Il est partit en me traitant de putain. Je rappelle que c’était à l’heure de pointe dans un métro bondé où personne n’a sourcillé ni ne m’a demandé si j’étais correct lorsqu’en haut des escaliers j’étais en état de choc.

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L’histoire de Myriam ”Hey minou! Tu me ferais tu une pipe pour 3 piastres”

Dans l’entrée du métro Radisson, paisiblement en attendant l’autobus, un homme avec une allure étrange entre, sachant très bien qu’il avait consommé des substances illicites, me regarde en plein visage et me dit : ”Hey minou! Tu me ferais tu une pipe pour 3 piastres”!!

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”Majorité Opprimée” – Qu’en pensez vous ? What do you think ?

Salut Hollabackers !
 
Vous avez peut-être déjà visionné ce court-métrage d’Éleonore Pourriat – Majorité Opprimée – qui circule depuis quelques jours, et on se demande ce que vous en pensez.
 
Voici nos observations: Le vidéo est un exemple percutant et efficace qui démontre bien plusieurs problématiques, notamment le harcèlement publique et les attentes sociales superficielles dont les femmes et les hommes sont victimes à tous les jours. Par contre, il y a un moment dans l’histoire qui fait référence à une femme portant le voile, et cette partie du vidéo est diminutive et méprisante. De plus, la représentation d’une personne sans-abris dans cette vidéo illustre une attitude entièrement apathique envers ce groupe et renforce plusieurs stéréotypes néfastes.
 
Qu’en dites vous ? Jetez-y un coup d’oeil et laissez nous savoir !
 
 
 
Bonne journée !
- L’équipe Hollaback Montréal
 
Hello Hollabackers!

So this video by Eléonore Pourriat has been popping up all over our social media circles, and we want to know what you think about it.

What we think: The video treats the issue of both street harassment and gendered expectations of behaviour in our society extremely well. However, it also includes a very short reference to the issue of women wearing the veil which we found dismissive, simplistic, unbalanced and unnecessary for the specific aim of the video. Furthermore, its only portrayal of the homeless plays directly into the stereotype of homeless people as good for nothing, rude harassers, rather real people in need of help.

What do you think?

Watch the video yourselves and let us know!

http://www.upworthy.com/a-french-film-showing-men-what-being-a-woman-feels-like-kinda

Love,

 
the Montreal Hollaback team.
 

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Feminism: It’s Good for Men, Too

 

This piece by Jess Mary Aloe for Feminspire is a really great beginner’s guide to feminism 101 type of article. It does a great job articulating why feminism is important and beneficial for EVERYBODY, contrary to what some may think. A good introduction to the complexities of the feminist movement!

”But first: what the hell is feminism, anyway?

It’s an easy umbrella term for any pro-women’s rights movement, but feminism is not a monolith and never has been. It takes different forms in different countries, being closely intertwined with local culture. Feminism is currently widely accepted to have three “waves,” although there is a staggering diversity in ideology even among the waves. The first wave is generally defined as being focused on the legal discrimination against women–for example, the suffragettes were first-wave feminists. The second wave arose during the 1960s, and broadened the debate to questions of inequality in sexuality, workplaces and the family. The third wave came in response to the second wave, and is widely believed to have risen in response to the “Feminist Sex Wars,” a series of debates in the late 1970s and early 1980s between feminists about pornography, sex work, the role of trans women and kink, among other issues. The third wave also shifted the discussion to how the feminist movement excluded women of color, and began considering the idea of intersectionality.”

Read the whole thing here:

 

Feminism: It’s Good for Men, Too

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When Was The First Time You Were Harassed? By Debjani Roy

This fantastic piece by Djebani Roy (of iHollaback) highlights how early on street harassment is often first experienced and how much of an impact it can have on the lives of those affected. The text is filled with useful links and also introduces HOLLA 101: An Educator’s Guide to Street Harassment, which launches this week. Have a look:

”Whether you’re talking about the comments like “hey baby” or “can I get a piece of that?”; the leering and lip smacking; the overtly physical acts of touching and groping; the non-physical but threatening acts like public masturbation, being the target of street harassment can start early. Very early.”

 
 

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